What they traded to survive.
Trade was one of the smartest things the Mesopotamian people did to survive because, the water was starting to unearth the salt in the dirt making it too salty too grow crops in.


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Foods items they traded
They traded for foods like wheat and oil with foods like wild fruits or berries. They may of traded the fruits because they don't fill your stomach as much as wheat. They also traded melons, oils, and wine for meats like poultry or fish. Trade was like the start of a new way of life, because instead of growing to share with everyone they started to get greedier and grew only for their family, sort of like us now in the future.


Materials they traded
They may of also traded clay or clay pots for wood from fallen trees, or maybe cloth for sea shells. They also may of traded for copper for jade, silver for gold, or lead for flint. They traded for terracotta pots made of clay and coloured gemstones exp lapis lazuli or turquoise.


Vocabulary
Trade, meaning the action of buying and selling items. If they hadn't learned to trade their life would of been a lot more difficult for them, they would have to move to a different areas, abandoning their houses and farms and starting from scratch all over again.

Growing, meaning the process of maturity. learning to grow crops and animals was very important. If they hadn't learned to grow crops and animals what would they trade for other things?

Trees, a woody perennial plant. trees were the base of how they gotten all their trades. trees were used to make spears to herd the animals. Hoes made out of sticks, rope, and rocks were used to plow the dirt so they could plant their crops to trade with in the first place.


References
http://mesopotamia.mrdonn.org/commerce.html
http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/primaryhistory/indus_valley/trade_and_travel/
http://www.penn.museum/sites/iraq/?page_id=52
https://mesopotamiadiv1.wikispaces.com/Trade+And+commerce+Mesopotamia
http://www.mesopotamia.co.uk/trade/home_set.html
http://mesopotamia.mrdonn.org/commerce.html